Native American Foster Parent Recruitment

Have you ever considered that foster parenting could be part of your family traditions?

Native American tradition is rooted in the belief and practice that all members of the extended family have an obligation to care for children. Grandparents, aunts and uncles, brothers and sisters and other relatives share in the parenting responsibilities.

The Siouxland area has an urgent need for Native American families to foster Native American children, and Four Oaks and LSI are proud to be part of the NF4NC (Native Families for Native Children) project, which is a collaborative effort between the Winnebago, Omaha, Ponca and Santee Tribes; the Iowa Department of Human Services; the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services; and private agency partners.

As part of the project, we are working to recruit, train, license and support Native American families in accord with the traditions, needs and resources of their communities. Families can even choose to attend training classes specifically for Native American families if they would like.

Could you or someone you know help carry forth this important tradition and keep children connected to their culture?
 

How to explore foster parenting

To learn more about the process and to inquire online, you can start here. Or, if you would prefer, you can contact our staff directly for more information. Thank you for considering foster care!

Native Families for Native Children staff contact:
Dawn Luetje
dawn.luetje@LSIowa.org
712.263.9341

 

About the artwork

We would like to thank artist Gary Trudell for the honor of using his artwork in our Native American family recruitment efforts. You can see the art on our materials, website and on our billboard. Here is what Gary has to share about this special art:

Native American Foster Care Recruitment

“All cultures have legends and stories. Native American folklore has one about the Star People who give direction and guidance to those on earth. Tribes would look at the night sky and see pictures the stars would form giving guidance on how to live in balance with nature and other peoples.

It’s becoming more evident in this time of change, in the year 2014, that Native Americans who hold these cultural traditions embody the strength of family and must pass on those values and beliefs to their children and future generations.

This picture was made using white dots of color on a red background, the color red representing the Buffalo Nation of the Plains, the white dots presenting the Star People. The images represent the sacred trust that connects all Native Americans.”